09 July, 2012

Cunning ways to catch a fox...

The more vague a prophecy is, the more likely it is correct. Alternately, the more accurate a prediction is, the more likely it is correct. Predictions are based on scientific data, whereas prophecy is based on sensory data at the expense of logic. People who are good at predicting events are extremely logical. People who are good at prophecy are very illogical. Both can be accurate, since logic is not a propos the final determinate of what will happen.

As an example, one sees an approaching storm front. A scientist would predict rain, possible lightening and wind. A prophet would see water, darkness (clouds) interspersed with brilliant lights (lightening). In the western world, one is useful, the other a mere curiosity; one mature in outlook, the other childlike in simplicity. Both are important for determining an outcome, but only one has scientific validity. A scientists would predict preparing with shelter or an umbrella, whereas the prophet would advise a torch or boat, depending on his/her skills.

When it comes to using logical reasoning on future occurrences, what will occur as a predictive event is based on:
  1. knowing what has happened (historical records)
  2. predicting what is likely to happen based on 1)
  3. normalcy bias interpretation of 2)
Normalcy bias is counter-intuitive and takes into account what is limited by our expectations. Normalcy bias limits prophecy. The more one is affected by normalcy bias, the less prophetic one is. Nature has a way of ignoring normalcy bias. Random strangeness occurs commonly in the physical world. But random strangeness is only strange to human perception, not natural states. Bizarre phenomenon are common in nature, from jumping genes, UFOs, ghosts, time warps, lenticular clouds, sun dogs. eternal storms, orange moons, sailing stones, mammatus clouds, light pillars, rains of fish, red rain and fire rainbows. Anyone can look at the unexplained, and given enough information, can find an explanation. But to guess the future is like peering through a foggy looking glass. Knowing what will happen can only be based on experience and interpretation of that experience. As de Lamartine once said, experience is the real prophecy of wise men. Prophesy is mouthed most accurately by poets, who weave their magic in words as subtle and obtuse as possible so as to enchant yet at the same time confuse.

Before his death, Socrates made his first and last prophecy, that Athens would fall to tyranny from within. Athens was already rife with political and financial corruption. It was not a gigantic leap of faith to see what was inevitable for this nation state. Similarly before her curse, Cassandra prophesied the fall of Troy, though no one believed her when she mentioned that Troy would be felled by a single horse (i.e. the Trojan Horse). Even the Buddha made a famous prophetic remark that Buddhism would only last 500 years if nuns were ordained. Anyone who is not poetic cannot channel the muse of timeless motion, not even the Buddha. Not because saints cannot see into the future but because they usually refrain from doing so, fraught as it is with the inaccuracies of quantum mechanics.

Most people use predictive reasoning when it comes to foretelling what will happen in the near future. Economists, for example, can speculate on what is happening based on flowcharts. Medicos can speculate based on statistics and patient vitals. But the greatest difficulty in prophesy is the effect known as interference. Interference is a karmic property where benevolent or malevolent energies can directly affect the future in a positive or negative way. Cabalists know this. Saints know this. Any act of either positive or negative karma upsets the future permanently. One of the hardest lessons I have personally had to learn is that evil men are as equally intelligent as good men. The main distinction I have found is that evil cunning is based on personal gain rather than the gain for the greater good. Inevitably, selfish acts are self-destructive, as is seen with the current disintegration of the corrupt financial system. But remember that even a trapped fox will bite off his own leg to escape a trap. Thus we cannot assume the collapse of a global economy is any different to the Cabal eating off its own foot.

Putting normalcy bias aside, one can prophesy an alternate present day where well known and reported truths have been suppressed for ulterior financial motives. Of these, we could include a number of social events that have been suppressed as a result of resident evil within society. These include:
  1. A radioactive planet - the use of uranium in nuclear reactors instead of thorium, primarily because uranium is excavated for military use and is expensive to mine (i.e. mining profits)
  2. A cannibal cabal that has withstood the failed assassination of  King Phillip IV of France in 1307, the failed suppression of the Jesuits in 1773, the end of Nazi domination through WWII only to re-materialise in the USA via Operation Paperclip.
  3. Suppression of Tesla energy devices
  4. Promotion of live-attenuated vaccines against manageable non-threatening or enzootic diseases


Predictive scenarios at present indicate an implosion of global banking. Whether or not this is a good thing is still a moot point and will not be completely understood until mid 2013. The downfall of corrupt banksters aside, some insiders, such as Rev. Lindsey Williams, have predicted the November 2012 global financial crisis is being delicately orchestrated by the cabal to coincide with the 2012 USA elections and a third world war following bankruptcy of all world currencies. Others have interpreted these as well as other events as evidence of a collapsing of the Cabal. Any event can be observed from many points of view. And simply viewing it can alter the outcome. 

The easiest way to catch a fox is to rely on his hunger to ensnare him. The bait is our compassion (or our 'soft meat' if we consider the tortoise in the fable about the tortoise and the fox). We then entice them into the deep waters (the stilled or peaceful mind of legal truth) and allow them to drown in their own folly. No force is required. No violence. 

One thing is for sure - a deluge is coming for the fox, watched by the wise men above (see below).